Running Injuries That Breed More Injuries

October 28, 2011

Healthy Life

Running Injuries That Breed More Injuries

 

 

Running Injuries That Breed More Injuries

Running Injuries That Breed More Injuries

 

It’s no surprise that people tend to think about things more – and also overthink them – after getting afflicted with an ailment, injury, or other life issue. When someone close to you dies, it’s only natural to think about your own mortality. Similarly, after being hospitalized for an illness, it’s easy to worry whether you have truly recovered and whether the illness will return. This fear is only accentuated when there are more reminders of your ordeal. For example, if you were to sit in on the full diagnostic, Medical Billing And Coding practices after being sidelined with a disease, it makes sense that you probably would tend to think about it even more.

This can also occur on a less traumatic level for those who exercise regularly or play competitive sports. In this category, the reminders of a past injury are even more lasting when the sport involves a repetitive motion that keeps placing stress on the spot of the injury. For this reason, runners in particular have a hard time psychologically shaking off an injury that occurred at some point in the recent past. If you were sidelined for months with tendonitis in your left foot, you’ll probably feel pretty good when you first start coming back, so long as you’re truly healthy. But you’ll also run on the foot more gingerly, pay closer attention to it, and – consequently – be more likely to conjure a new injury into existence. It’s understandable: if our body sustained an injury while performing a certain motion, it would make sense that it is susceptible whenever that motion is repeated.

There are many studies out there that show running to have a strong psychological component. Runners told that they are moving slower than during a past performance will often speed up, even if they were already going faster. Runners with competition can usually push themselves harder than can those who are running alone. And, on the injury front, runners told that grass is better for their legs often report feeling better after a soft-surface jog, even though the benefits of doing so range from minimal to none. So the idea that an injury can breed a culture of further health issues makes sense when considered within the realm of running. But unlike some of these other psychological factors, injuries impact not only your performance, but also whether you can run in the first place

Imagined injuries are also hard to dispel. If a runner has a history of stress fractures and thinks he has another, an x-ray will probably not be able to conclusively rule a new stress fracture out. Even more difficult to dispute are shin splints, IT band issues, knee pain, plantar fasciitis, and ankle problems. All of these injuries are very real and can sideline a runner for a long period of time, but they are also hard to rule out. If a relatively minor ache or pain causes one of these injuries to manifest itself in a runner’s head, there are not many recourses to address the issue. In this sense, once a person suffers from a intermittent injuries, there’s a good chance that a further cycle of injuries will be bred as a result.

Of course, there are many runners out there who are injury prone and have legitimately suffered from five stress fractures during their running career. But oftentimes a follow-up injury is just as likely to be imagined, which speaks volumes to the fascinating interplay between mind and body, between psychology and sport.

 

Running Injuries That Breed More Injuries

 


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Running Injuries

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