Diabetes Types 1 and 2

May 15, 2012

Dieting

Diabetes Types 1 and 2

 

Diabetes Types 1 and 2

Diabetes Types 1 and 2

Many of us know of diabetes as almost an urban legend. The rest of us have it. It’s astonishing for such a common illness to be so misunderstood. In America, almost half the population has a form of diabetes. According to many well-researched diabetes news articles, by the 2020 over half the nation’s population will have the disease, at the estimated cost of $3.35 trillion. However, there are two types of diabetes and it’s important that people understand the difference between Types 1 and 2.

Type 1 diabetes, also known as “juvenile” diabetes, is when the body is unable to properly produce insulin, which requires the person to inject it on a regular basis. Type 2 diabetes, also known as “adult onset” diabetes, is a condition in which the person’s cells are not properly using the body’s production of insulin. This is known as insulin resistance.

Both are chronic illnesses, but they have different symptoms, onset times and different treatments as well. The symptoms for Type 1 diabetes are irritability, weight loss, and hunger. The symptoms for Type 2 are slow-healing cuts and sores, leg pain, itchy skin, and dry mouth. Both types share a a few symptoms as well, including frequent urination, increased thirst, and blurry vision.

These two types of diabetes have different onset times. Type 1 diabetes sets in quickly, within weeks, whereas Type 2 can take years. Type 1 diabetes is mostly found in children and teens, whereas Type 2 is found in adults and ethnic groups. The forms of treatment vary also, although both types can be better managed with a healthy diet and exercise. Type 1 requires daily insulin injections in order to oversee proper glucose levels.

Type 2 may also require injections, although it will often principally involve prescription medication that can improve a person’s insulin sensitivity.

Recent research by Diabetic Connect and other groups underscore the importance of people with diabetes embracing a heavily plant-based, whole foods diet. This includes natural fats, legumes, raw nuts and seeds, and tons of vegetables.

This combined with regular exercise can dramatically improve a Type 2 diabetic condition.

 

Diabetes Types 1 and 2


This site is for information and support only and NOT a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment!
Diabetes

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